The number of passenger journeys made in Great Britain was down 1.3% in the first quarter of 2013 – the first decline since the height of the recession

The number of rail passenger journeys made on Great Britain’s railways was down 1.3% year-on-year in the first quarter of this year, according to new data from the Office of Rail Regulation.

It is the first time that demand for rail travel has fallen since 2009, when the economy was in recession. Since then the railway has enjoyed 12 consecutive quarters of growth.

The Association of Train Companies shrugged off the figures. However, the Department for Transport is investigating whether fare increases are starting to choke off growth.

 

Related reports can be found inside the latest issue of Passenger Transport:


DfT fears fare rises are now choking demand
Underlying growth in volumes has started to flatten in some areas

ATOC says underlying growth continues
Passengers put off travel by coldest March on record

 

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